Whole and Part

Just as a maze
can be more easily navigated
when we see its whole
—from above it—
than when we see it partially
—from within it—,
when we see our problem in its whole,
the solution
can often become obvious.

Then perhaps
the first step
to seeing the whole
was to realize
that we were seeing it
from within.

That we,
our perspectives,
were a part
of the problem.

Problem vs Paradox

If
1 + 1 = ?
is a problem

and

“This is a lie.”
is a paradox,

a problem often implies
the method—
in this case
addition
—with which to solve
the problem,

while a paradox
does not.

If you mistake
a paradox
for a problem,
the more time you spend
applying the method
you think
will solve the problem,
the more time
you may spend
staying stuck.

Tension as Problem vs Paradox

Richard Feynman—
Physicist—
once said,
“Paradox
is only a conflict between
Reality
vs
Our feeling of what reality
ought to be.”​​

I define tension
as a conflict between​
What we have
vs
What we need or value.

When I noticed
the remarkable similarity
between these two,
I realized
that we can either
judge tension as “bad,”
so as to frame it as a “problem.”
or
We can let it evoke
our curiosity and wonder
so as to frame it
as a “paradox.”

The choice
can be ours.